Search
  • Randy C. Lewis

WHAT IT'S LIKE TO BE BOUNTIFUL'S MAYOR

Updated: Jul 14, 2021


The other day, someone asked me what has been the most satisfying thing about being mayor. I had to think for a minute as I processed that question. There have been hundreds of memorable experiences with people, and there is enormous satisfaction from being part of a leadership team that works well together. Bountiful is the best place to live, and our employees work very hard to keep it that way. However, that wasn’t what my questioner was looking for. He wanted to know, “What has really touched you? What has changed you for the better?” Two meaningful experiences come to mind. Bountiful City has hosted the Larry H. Miller Tour of Utah, the past three years. This cycling race is inspiring, and some of the greatest cyclists in the world have passed our finish line on Main Street. As the mayor, I have several necessary duties to perform to make this event happen. For me, it’s like having the Olympic Games right here in our city! My favorite responsibility, however, is coordinating the placement of nearly 4,000 American flags along Bountiful's nine mile race route. I get to work with Scout troops and other volunteers to get the job done. I presented a beautiful painting, by Anne Marie Oborn, to the winner of the 2015 race. After the presentation, an official with the Tour of Utah, who inspects the course all across the state, came up to me and told me he rarely gets emotional -- but when he saw so many American flags, mile after mile, tears came down his cheeks. His reaction to our city, and our citizens, was truly touching. I was happy he felt what I already knew...that Bountiful is a special place. While serving as Mayor of Bountiful I have had countless interactions with residents. I've loved talking with people and learning from them..even when there are disagreements. It is so easy for people to be angry in a text or email; however, when we speak face to face, we can usually work out the differences and reason together. I’ve explained many times that we pulled the plug on building a new city hall because we concluded that people are more important than buildings. A more valuable lesson, however, was the reminder that people are more important than the process. One day, in my official capacity, I became frustrated with a woman who demanded my attention after a public comment period had ended. I was short, curt and unnecessarily thoughtless toward her. After all, I felt I needed to observe the process of the meeting. I immediately felt sorry that I had spoken to her as I did, and suffered a pain of guilt the next day. Months later, I randomly chose a neighborhood and decided to hand out campaign flyers. I came to a house that was obviously not voting for me -- a pleasant woman answered the door, took my flyer, and thanked me for coming. Just two houses down, I struck up a conversation with a man. We had a nice chat and as I turned to leave he asked if I had talked to the woman two doors up. I said I had spoken to her. He told me she was very upset with me for being rude to her several months prior. I instantly knew it was the woman that I was feeling so sorry about. I quickly walked back to the woman's door and rang the bell. When she opened the door, she asked, “What do you want now?” I was glad to have the chance to look into her eyes and sincerely tell her how sorry I was that I treated her poorly the last time we met. She was silent for a few seconds, and then she graciously said, “You were already upset about other things when we talked.” I said it was no excuse for my behavior and that I was glad I could apologize in person. She opened up her arms and we gave each other a big hug, the kind of hug that feels forgiving and refreshing. For me, this moment was so much more important than politics. She said, “You know, we were both angry that day.” As I left, I said, “Whenever you come to a City Council meeting and have something to say, I’ll see that you have the floor.” I’ll remember that hug the rest of my life. Being able to serve as Mayor has been so rewarding. We've been able to build a terrific park, bring the Tour of Utah, and other businesses to Bountiful, and I’m pleased that Bountiful has lower taxes and fees than all but 4 of Utah’s 50 largest cities. However, all the success aside, my biggest accomplishment has been the interactions I've had with the wonderful citizens of Bountiful. I've learned from you. I'm grateful for your support, kindness and willingness to engage in our city's government. People will always have disagreements; but we don’t have to be disagreeable about them. I’m committed to doing my part better. Mayor Randy Lewis



18 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

Mayor Randy Lewis My opponent and friend, Kendalyn, has accomplished lots of good things, and she has a family that anyone would be proud of. If she is our next mayor, I’ll be the first to congratulat

By Delivering a $21 Million Redevelopment Agency Fund Renewal That Made Our Town Square a Reality Mayor Randy Lewis If you like the new Town Square, it wasn’t created by the wave of a wizard’s wand. F